Verkhoyansk Russia

Verkhoyansk Russia

Verkhoyansk used to be known as an exile destination which was first used by the Czars and then by the Soviets. Now it is seen to be attracting extreme tourism – people who want to come and experience the intense temperatures. The town has never had more than 2500 residents and now is thought to still have 1500.

It is set 3000 miles east of Moscow in the heart of Siberia. Verkhoyansk sits on the bank of the Yana River which is apparently frozen over for 9 months of the year!

It has claimed to be the coldest town on earth and has been dubbed the “Cold Pole”. During December to January there is basically no sunlight and September to March the average amount of sunlight is only 5 hours per day! Now can you image what it might be like to live there – very isolated?!

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Kerguelen Islands

Kerguelen Islands

These Islands are known as the “Desolation Islands”, due to the fact that they are so far away from any other habitable place. The Kerguelen Islands are placed in the Southern Indian Ocean which makes reaching them very difficult! We have heard that you have to take a 6 day boat ride from Reunion, Madagascar.

In terms of inhabitants, there are no native peoples, but like Antarctica you will find teams of researchers from France (which claims the Islands as their territory -not sure anyone will be in a hurry to dispute this!).

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Pitcairn Islands

Pitcairn Islands

The Pitcairn Islands are a rocky group of inhabited islands in the South Pacific, only accessible by boat and typically from New Zealand. The population is approximately 50, with this swelling to 10 times the number when visits are made from Cruise ships. Cruise ships passing by are a big occasion on the islands due to their infrequency. The locals eagerly await these visits and help to make the travelers feel welcome by giving them tours and talks.

The inhabitants are directly descended from mutineers of the HMS Bounty, the legendary ship that landed in the Pacific in 1789 and was overthrown by the sailors onboard, due to their reluctance to leave the beauty of the Islands. They stayed there ever since!

Perhaps this could be your next remote adventure!
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Nauru

Nauru

Nauru is the least visited island in the world today and is in fact an uplifted coral formation. It has less than 10000 inhabitants and is located in the deep Pacific, just north of the Solomon islands. It is less then 40 km south of the equator and the island itself is 21 square km across.

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Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland

Ittoqqortoormiit, Greenland

Ittoqqortoormiit is a remote town in Greenland which is part of a district about the size of the UK. The funny thing is, this district as of 2013 only has a population of 452.

Being the remotest habitable town in the Western Hemisphere, Ittoqqortoormiit has its drawbacks. It is difficult to get to – 9 months of the year in tough icy conditions the only access is via heliport. Business is limited too – the primary income for the local residents is hunting polar bears and whales and trading in their products. Due to the adverse weather conditions, fishing is impossible most of the year.

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Foula Island

Foula Island

Foula is the remotest inhabitable place in Britain. It is at the northern tip of Scotland and measures 3.5 x 2.5 miles. It has a fluctuating population but the average number appears to be around 25. There are apparently two ways of getting to Foula – you can wait for the bi-weekly ferry to come along or you can catch a tiny plane to the mainland. The wind conditions have to be right for the plane to run however, as the landing strip is not the largest and any cross winds could put a serious spanner in the works.

There are no pubs or shops on the island apart from a tiny little post office. Food is delivered weekly by plane as well as locals growing a few vegetables and rearing certain animals.

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Tristan Da Cunha

Tristan Da Cunha Island
Tristan Da Cunha Land and House

Tristan Da Cunha, an Island in the middle of the South Atlantic Ocean, is not only one of the most remote places on earth, but it is also considered to be quite dangerous. The island is mostly comprised of a large active volcano. Although no major eruptions have happened since the 60′s (1962), apparently there have been a few in-crater eruptions on a minor scale since. There are about 270 inhabitants here and any visits have to happen by boat, as the terrain is too rocky for any planes to land.
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Easter Island

Easter Island's Moai

Easter Island is about 2000 miles west of the Chilean coast in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. It is very famous for its “Moai”, the rock sculptures from the 1500′s that line its cost. It has around 4000 inhabitants and is around 70 square miles across. The island gets a fair amount of tourism due to these statues.
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La Rinconda, Peru

La Rinconda, Peru

La Rinconda is known for being the highest city in the world at 17 thousand feet above sea level. It is based on a permanently frozen glacier and due to its geographical make up, it is only reachable by truck through hundreds of miles of winding and dangerous mountain roads. Almost all of the 30 thousand inhabitants are involved in mining gold, being their primary occupation. Most in fact work for free but keep a small % of the value of the gold they find in the icy caverns in the mountains.

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Socotra Island

Socotra Island

Socatra is part of a group of 4 small islands in the Indian Ocean. It actually has a relatively large population of 40 thousand, but even so, due to its remoteness it has some of the most interesting flora in the world. This often leads to nicknames such as “alien Island” because of the way the trees and plants look.

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